First Period Could Start 30 Minutes Later – Update

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First Period Could Start 30 Minutes Later – Update

Tahtiana Foster, Staff Writer

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Update: Monday morning, October 14, Californians learned the news that Governor Gavin Newsom signed the bill that would set the new start time for high schools across the state to be no earlier than 8:30 am. This does not include 0 period classes that are considered outside of the traditional school day, but will have an effect on after-school activities, which will start later in most cases.

Governor Jerry Brown refused to sign Senate Bill 328 when he was in charge of the state, but the bill has passed to Governor Gavin Newsom, who has different ideas about school start times.

According to the revised bill, middle schools could start no later than 8 am and high school students wouldn’t have to be in their classes until 8:30 am. Challenges for making changes like this to school schedules are myriad. If it passes, schools would need time to prepare which could result in the bill being pushed back even farther back, although, if it passes, “it would go into effect in July 2022, for the 2022-23 school year” (Harington, 2019).

According to Edsource, it could take up to three years for high schools to have everything prepared to enforce the bill. Some districts are experimenting with late start times to see what adjustments must be made. Schools in the Vacaville Unified School District, for instance, have been practicing with changing the start time since August of 2018, trying one start time last fall and a different, earlier one, this school year. Although the thought of school starting later sounds like a benefit for students and others, some disagree. Many fear that it will affect programs that are hosted by schools, including sports and bus schedules, and even parents who base their schedule on when school ends. ”It’d be a hassle because I work, and already having to push an hour or two back so you can have a ride to school is enough,” said Armijo parent, Ms. Ramona Cooper.

The original intent of the bill, however, is to provide benefits for students. By starting school later, students would have the opportunity for improved health, additional sleep, and a better chance to absorb knowledge.

Interested in seeing what time schools start in other parts of the country? Check out this
article: https://www.livescience.com/51777-school-start-times-states.html.

 

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